From Bad To Worstward

by The Union Electric

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about

A new collection of original material based on the works of Irish writer Samuel Beckett. The Union Electric is joined by guests Kevin Buckley and Irene Allen-Sullivan.

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released October 15, 2013

The Union Electric:
Glenn Burleigh - pedal steel and electric guitar
Melinda Cooper - bass and drums
Mic Boshans - drums and percussion on "Every Word..."
Tim Rakehell - vocals and acoustic guitar, banjo feedback on "Every Word..."

with guests:
Irene Allen-Sullivan - vocals on "Left..." and "Nothing..."
Kevin Buckley - accordion on "Left..." and fiddle on "Every Word..."

recorded and mixed by Kevin Buckley and Glenn Burleigh
mastered by Carl Saff

cover art by Sleepy Kitty

Extension Chord Records (EC 04)

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about

The Union Electric St Louis, Missouri

The Union Electric is made up of veteran St. Louis musicians Tim Rakel, Glenn Burleigh, Melinda Cooper and Mic Boshans. Depending on the date/time/weather, Beth Bombara, Jake DeLeonardis, Mary DeLeonardis and/or Brad Vaughn may also make intermittent appearances in the line-up.

UE has released five 7" records, a EP of cover songs, and the CD "Time Is Gold".
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Track Name: Left At The Side
Left At The Side
the end's in the beginning
the bastards spoil the ending
I can't, I must
the fields and the ditches forever still
it was the train that moved right past

like a cold wet dog out in the rain
the fool and the blind man waiting for a train
two old men were walking across an ancient bridge

like scarecrows they seem familiar
cursing the sun and cursing the moon
on a park bench or in a ditch
or sitting in a tavern with Watt
I can't, I must, this boredom, this lust

like a cold wet dog out in the rain
two lost hobos waiting for a train
a train that will never arrive
just characters left behind

it was the train that moved right past
left us behind left us at the side
while we were sitting here in the tavern
or lying in a ditch, left us here at the side of the road

it was the train that moved right past
left us at the side of the road


"Left At The Side" is derived from a couple of Samuel Beckett's novels, "Watt" and "Mercier and Camier". Although many of the lines and details come from Beckett's work, "the fool and the blind man" dropped in from a W.B. Yeats poem. I wrote a train song because of the ending of "Watt".
Track Name: Every Word A Stain
"Every Word A Stain" employs a fiddle tune by a Mr. O'Reilly called "Man Of The House" to reclaim part of Beckett's work for Ireland. His Irish roots are apparent throughout much of his writing, including the house and countryside in "Watt". The text of this piece is taken from excerpts of that novel and Kevin Buckley picked out this particular reel for the accompaniment.
Track Name: Day Of The Dead
Day Of The Dead
you say you get up and you say it's another lovely day
but I wouldn't go that far I really wouldn't go that far
how far would you go to protect this?
to protect this this particular way of life
where I feel most alive on the day of the dead

how far would you go?
to protect this way of life
you say it's a lovely day
but I wouldn't go that far
I really wouldn't go that far


"Day Of The Dead" started with a quote from Beckett, not from his writing but rather his conversation. Going for a walk, a friend proclaimed that it was a lovely day. Beckett's response was "I wouldn't go that far". A similar sentiment opens his play "Happy Days" and I took it from there.
Track Name: Nothing To Be Done
Nothing To Be Done
come on in the kitchen come on everyone
like an Irishman said 'nothing to be done'
do you want to go out drinking? I said let's go
do you want to go out drinking? come on let's go
there's a hole in my head the size of a shot glass
a hole in my mind the size of a shot

displacement's the law try to steal a crust of bread
gravity's physical law it'll knock you down dead

last night's a blur seemed I loved everyone
there's no disorder here just let me find my gun
do you want to go out drinking? I said let's go
do you want to go out drinking? come on let's go
there's a hole in my head the size of a shot glass
a hole in my mind the size of a shot

nothing to be done just a shifting about
there's no disorder here and nothing to be done
do you want to go out drinking? I said let's go
do you want to go out drinking? yes let's go



"Nothing To Be Done" began as one of the tunes written by Irene Allen to accompany a stage play by Jason Lauderdale called "Zombozo". I took the music and set to writing a version of "Waiting for Godot" recast as a drinking song.